Keith Bush, Ph.D.

Position

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry

Contacts

Phone: 501.526.8347
E-mail: kabush@uams.edu

Research Experience

Dr. Keith Bush received his degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania and his doctoral degree in Computer Science from Colorado State University. His doctoral research explored mathematical structures for implementing adaptive control systems, e.g., reinforcement learning, to real-world nonlinear dynamical systems. In 2008 he accepted a postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Joelle Pineau of McGill University where he applied real-time adaptive control systems to suppress epileptiform activity in animal models of epilepsy. This work was done in collaboration with neurophysiologists at the Montreal Neurological Institute. In 2010 he joined the faculty at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and established a machine learning collaboration with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) to analyze multimodal neuroimaging and behavioral datasets. In 2015, Dr. Bush joined the Dept. of Psychiatry at UAMS as an assistant professor in the Brain Imaging Research Center (BIRC).

Research Interests

Dr. Bush has focused his research interests on machine learning and control theoretic approaches to real-time human neuroimaging, using both real-time fMRI and fMRI-based neurofeedback to understand and exploit volitional regulation of cognitive processesn. By understanding how the human brain decodes and integrates neurofeedback signals into its cognitive control processing, Dr. Bush hopes to optimize neuroimaging studies and develop new control theoretic diagnostic instruments and treatments for emotional dysregulation and attendant pathologies, such as addiction.

Recent Publications

Bush K, Inman C, Hamann S, Kilts C, James G. Distributed Neural Processing Predictors of Multi-dimensional Properties of Affective Signals, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2017; 11:459.

James GA, Hazaroglu O, Bush K. A human brain atlas derived via n-cut parcellation of resting-state and task-based fMRI data. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2016; 34(2): 209–218. PMID: 26523655.

Cisler J, Bush K, James GA, Smitherman S, Kilts C. Decoding the traumatic memory among women with PTSD: implications for neurocircuitry models of PTSD and real-time fMRI neurofeedback. PLOS One, 2015; 10(8), e0134717. PMCID: PMC4524593.

Bush K, Cisler J, Bian J, Hazaroglu G, Hazaroglu O, Kilts C. Improving the precision of fMRI BOLD signal deconvolution with implications for connectivity analysis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2015; 33(10), 1314–1323. PMCID: PMC4658302.

Bush K, Zhou S, Cisler J, Bian J, Hazaroglu O, Gillispie K, Yoshigoe K, Kilts C. A deconvolution-based approach to identifying large-scale effective connectivity. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2015; 33(10): 1290–1298. PMCID: PMC4658309.

Stinson P, Bush K. Exogenous control of echo state networks with Q-Learning. In: Proceedings of International Joint Conference on Neural Networks. Dallas, TX, 2013.